#FocusFriday – Focus on Video Today for Your Brand and Business

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Who would have thought that billions of hours of video content would be uploaded to YouTube and other online sites each month? The growth of video is astonishing and will continue to grow in the years to come. With mobile technology and smart phones, we have a powerful tool in our hands which you must use for marketing and growing your personal brand. Why is using video so critical now? How can you get started?

The purpose of my #FocusFriday series is to provoke thought and encourage people to take control of their personal marketing and business. Focus on the important time saving, business development, marketing and fun aspects of business. Yes, business activities should not be painful every minute of the day. Hard work is necessary and to be successful you have to hustle, try new approaches and focus on finding what works.

If you are not embracing video now for your brand and for marketing, it’s time to start. Here are the reasons why:

  1. More and more people (consumers and prospects) prefer video content. It’s quick, easy to watch on a mobile device and does not take much time.
  2. Besides meeting in person, video is the best way to convey your personal brand message to those you with whom want to build relationships and business. For some it may even be the best approach; a well-crafted, practiced and perfected video message can convey an exceptional and memorable message.
  3. Producing a video forces an individual to focus on their message, delivery, value proposition and differentiators. Knowing your message and differentiators and being and able to clearly convey it will allow you to more quickly educate prospects and your audiences about who you are, what you do and why you do it.
  4. Without video you are not being competitive, you are actually at a competitive disadvantage without having video as part of your marketing. Your bigger, smarter and more marketing savvy competitors are using video and have been leveraging its power for some time. If you don’t have a video strategy, you are at least two years behind your competition and they are pulling ahead fast and your falling farther behind.
  5. There are many types of video: TV News interviews, video podcasts, corporate videos, videos of speaking presentations, webinars, video conferences, live streaming video (Facebook, Periscope, MereKat, LiveStream, Google Hangouts and others) and how to and educational videos and TV and online commercials. YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat, Blogs and other social media platforms have video elements. These are all conduits for reaching your audiences and building relationships and growing your brand and business.

For many, the thought of doing a personal brand video is a scary proposition; they simply don’t know where to start. This is a legitimate fear and challenge. The process of creating a quality video and regular video content takes a commitment of time, energy and you need to be confident in your ability. Confidence and the ability to present and communicate on video must be developed.

Where should you start?

Start by thinking about your customers, prospects, referral sources as well as allies and enemies. Who are they? What do they need to know about you? For some this may boil down to a simple elevator speech or pitch, for others it may be more complex. Remember, the video content that you are creating is for your audience and not for you. You must have a clear and understandable message, project this message properly, look the part, use the right body language and come across as genuine.

Starting to get complicated, right? Well it is complicated. It’s easy to set up a camera, lights and microphone. You can buy expensive equipment or even hire a professional video production crew. However, without understanding the message you want to deliver to your audiences, it could be a colossal waste of time, energy and money. The end product could make you look worse.

Let’s take a step back and discuss preparing. Over the past 25 years I have trained and prepared hundreds of people for news media interviews, many for local and national TV appearances. There is no greater pressure to perform than being asked to do live television. A live TV appearance can make or break a career, and we know the value of news media coverage is unmatched in its value for marketing. Why do I bring up live TV appearances? The process of preparing for live TV, or even a recorded TV interview, is the same that you must follow when preparing to make a video. The pressure may not be as intense and you may have a few shots at making your points, however, failure to think about your audience, message and the reason for the video will limit your success or even the ability to present effectively.

Once you craft your message, it is time to start practicing. Practicing for video goes beyond just memorizing or rereading a speech or talking points. For those seeking to be exceptional on camera, preparation will require an understanding of presentation and communication skills. How do to you acquire these skills? It takes a commitment to focus on yourself and your abilities. Studying, training with professionals, reading and learning are required. The best students we have worked with and trained are those who embrace this adventure. The investment of the time, energy and effort pay off in a product that is more than the powerful videos and TV interviews that are created. Individuals become better communicators of their personal brand message. They are more confident when speaking, networking and interacting directly with clients and staff.

Make the commitment today to get your video marketing program moving forward. Craft your message and get the training and coaching you need to present effectively.

Click here for a check list of 15 points to follow when developing your personal marketing video program.

Focus Friday is all about being more effective and successful in business and life activities. Focusing will allow you to save time and achieve goals in both your personal and in your professional life.

Have questions, need a resource? Contact me at wjcorbett@corbettpr.com.

Need to start creating a personal marketing plan?  Email the code PMP2016 to me at info@growyourpersonalbrand.com and I will send you a list of questions to ask yourself to get started.

Looking for some help setting up your LinkedIn plan? Visit www.growyourpersonalbrand.com

Join our groups on LinkedIn and Facebook.

wjcorbett@corbettpr.com

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

@corbettpr

Personal Brand Actions to Take in 2016 – Start Today

hourglass 2016.jpgStrategies and Predictions

I recently wrote a blog about taking action steps to achieve goals. As we end 2015, let’s look at some specific action steps you can take to Grow Your Personal Brand in 2016, achieve your goals and attain long term success.

Make time, don’t waste time.

First, stop talking about not having enough time. Recognize that your time is valuable and you need to focus on what you need to get done. If you want be successful you may have to get up early, stay up late and work more. Do you know that billionaires typically get up three hours before the “work day” starts? Set your priorities and create real deadlines. Block off the time you need each day to move closer to your goals.

As part of time saving, examine social media activities. Are you getting the ROI (return on investment) or ROE (return on effort)? If the answer is “no” or “I don’t know,” then it is time to re-evaluate these activities. For most small business people and solo entrepreneurs your time is very valuable; Tweeting, Facebooking and posting images to Instagram is probably not the best use of your time. If it is not generating income or leads, delegate it or stop doing it. Focus on what works in terms of business development and sales.

Focus

archery[1].jpgWe live in a world where distractions are killing our productivity and sucking away our time. One way to save your valuable and precious time is to learn how to remove distractions. Distractions hurt us in many ways more than just stopping us from doing what we need to do – they make us lose focus and concentration. It takes 10 to 25 minutes to get back into our productivity zone again. What’s the solution?  Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Put your cell phone in another room or turn it off (I personally need to have it in another room or I am tempted to check it every 5 minutes). Do whatever you can to get it out of your view and reach. I know you are afraid to go without your smartphone. What do I do? I go into settings and forward my calls to my office. My staff answers or it goes to voice mail. Give staff, colleagues, clients and friends the message that you can only be interrupted in the case of a real emergency.
  2. Remove distracting sounds. Sounds break up your flow and concentration. No surprise, this is a natural response to danger. What can you do? Try noise cancelling headphones or ear plugs. For some people it requires moving to another room and closing the door or even going to another building.  Create a distraction proof environment.
  3. Turn off all message notifications from social media, texts or email. This is hard to do, we want to be connected but these messages distract and even if you can avoid looking, you know you really want to. Your scheduled time should be sacred and this means email and other digital messages should not distract you.   Emails and texts can wait an hour or two.

Create that Plan

I always ask my LinkedIn or personal branding students if they have a plan for marketing with LinkedIn or a personal marketing plan. Only 5 percent have a plan. For this year make the commitment – not resolution – to create a plan. You need to have a road map and a plan to get to where you want to go. You may be successful without a plan but think about how much more successful you could be with one. I believe the average sales person, business owner or entrepreneur will be 20 to 50 percent or more effective and successful if they simply created a plan and modified this plan every quarter and annually. From a personal perspective, I have a plan with goals and multiple action steps. I regularly achieve goals when I have a plan, when I don’t those goals take longer or are never achieved. The plan is critical for achieving goals, staying focused and saving time.

Create Your Video(s)

If you don’t have a video for your brand today you’re falling farther and farther behind your competitors. This statement is true not matter what industry you are in. Why? In the mobile age people (a.k.a. customers and prospects) don’t have time and they want video content. If you are not providing it and a competitor is, guess what?  The competitor is winning the battle for attention. The other more long term problem with not having video content is the fact that you are falling behind in the content war. By not creating content and getting comfortable communicating it on video you do not appear to be up-to-date and ready for the challenges of the digital age. Communications is an art and a skill, it requires practice. While anyone can fire up a camera or smart phone and shoot a Periscope video or post a video to YouTube, it takes practice to learn how to speak and present a quality message on video.

If you don’t have a video you are not conveying your brand message to contacts, prospects and referral sources. These are the people who create your brand and reputation. Without your personal content to guide them, perceptions will be inaccurate, they will not know what you stand for and they certainly will be less likely to hire you or recommend you to others.

Two predictions about video in 2016

  1. Video on LinkedIn will be much more important and likely will be positioned higher in profiles. Making/having a personal video not only will be needed on LinkedIn, but required for optimal success. Those who are ahead here will dominate for at least a year.
  2. Live streaming video from Periscope, Facebook and others will become much more widely used. If you are not doing this you’re going to get beaten by competitors, lose market share and you will not project the right image to those seeking you or your services.

Be Consistent with your persona marketing and messages

Your message and personal brand must also be consistent in the real world and online. Make sure all of your profiles, images and videos are consistent with your current personal brand and what you are passionate about. Confusion in the marketplace is not something you want when people are looking at you and considering you for a referral, recommendation or to hire you.

To succeed in marketing and in business you must present your messages and content regularly to your audience. Make the commitment this year to be consistent with your marketing. Regularly create and post videos, write your own blogs, post on on social media, attend events, send email newsletters and content and execute your marketing plan. Examine what works and don’t be afraid to change. Remember that for your personal brand to resonate with audiences you must have a consistent message that is delivered often. Consistency and frequency build and maintain trust, a critical component to personal brand growth and business success.

Have a great 2016 and make the commitment today to Grow Your Personal Brand.

Visit www.growyourpersonalbrand.com to learn more about personal branding training programs, events and more.

wjcorbett@corbettpr.com

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

@corbettpr

Are Lifeguards Watching Out for Your Brand?

A lifeguard watching over a pool.

A lifeguard watching over a pool.

Tragically, Long Island beaches have experienced a number of rip currents this summer that have led to drownings. Rip currents drag swimmers out into deep water. Swimmers then drown as they become exhausted fighting to swim back to shore. Even non-swimmers can get swept away by a rip current when standing in shallow water. Rip currents, rip tides and undertows are powerful forces of the sea that are difficult for even the most experienced swimmers to contend with. To escape the rip, the person must swim parallel to shore and NEVER swim against the current.

Unfortunately, swimmers panic and tire out in a short period of time and/or they may not know what to do in this type of situation. As a former lifeguard, I know the challenges and pressures a lifeguard faces when watching water conditions.  Lifeguards use their eagle eyes to look out for the safety of swimmers. I never was a lifeguard at an ocean beach – only at pools and lakes – but I had to come to the aid of close to 50 swimmers in just two summers.

Jumping into the ocean when lifeguards are not on duty is a risk, one that no one should ever take. The same is true for your brand.  When you open your business and jump into marketing and promotion, once you put just one foot into the water you are exposed to threats and risks to your business, which could consist of angry customer reviews or comments on social media, negative word of mouth comments about your business or a product or a poor review in the media.

There are many ways a brand or business can get in trouble. Some problems are completely out of the control of the business owner or management: a fire, an unwarranted lawsuit, theft by an employee, an extended power outage or a computer virus. Any of these can cause a major disruption in business and will quickly have a negative impact on a brand.

Every business must have a crisis plan in place for the day when something unexpected happens. The crisis plan, like an insurance policy, will provide you with a process for reacting to the problem at hand. The plan is only part of your response. You also need a “lifeguard,” somebody who can help keep you away from danger and step in when something bad happens. In fact, you need more than one lifeguard to make up an effective support team.

Your professional business team.

Your professional business team.

Your business lifeguard team must be comprised of the following professionals:

Reputation Monitor 

We live in the digital age and social media is a key part of marketing and branding. A crisis for any business can start online or in the cyber world. Negative reviews, comments and articles can damage a brand or business. Failure to know that your brand is under attack is unacceptable. It’s imperative that you or your team monitor your brand online. If you don’t have the time or lack experience, have your digital marketing firm monitor and report to you regularly about your online reputation. They should also have a plan ready should your brand come under attack online or in the real world.

We regularly monitor online news, social media sites and websites to make sure that nothing negative is being said about our clients’ companies, their products, their services, their staff, or owners/management. Online reputations must be monitored and if there is a need to address an issue, it must be done in the right way. Negative reviews, comments or even videos can damage a company’s ability to attract and keep business.

Crisis Communication Expert / Public Relations – Media Relations Expert 

If a crisis situation impacts customers, business or a community, it is likely to become of interest to the media. Negative press can lead to loss of business, clients questioning their relationship with you and damage to your brand (personal or business). Having a communications plan and a crisis communications expert available to you is important. At Corbett Public Relations we work with clients on Long Island and across the nation to establish a procedure to follow during a crisis. We see ourselves as professionals who are promoters and protectors of brands. Reacting to a crisis situation in the media takes thought and consideration. Every incident is different and those with decades of experience, such as the individuals on my team, know how to manage communications in all kinds of situations. At a minimum the owner of a business should consult with a firm and have a plan for managing a crisis and know who to call if the situation escalates. Would you know what to do if the media calls or shows up with cameras at your office? If you don’t, you need a plan today and the help of a crisis communications expert.

Attorneys

Your attorneys protect you before, during and after an incident. Make sure to consult with them and discuss potential risks and know how to get in touch with them during nights and weekends should a crisis situation occur. Discuss your concerns with your attorneys so you know that they are prepared to handle the types of situations that could possible occur. Attorneys have different types of practices so make sure your attorney is experienced in handling crisis situations.

Accountant/CPA

Crisis situations can come from many directions. Bankruptcy, fraud, ID theft, tax issues and other financial issues require the assistance of accountants. Your accountant should act proactively to warn you about issues and potential problems that could occur from their perspective. Your accountants will also be part of your team to provide reports and financial information should you need to defend your business and brand in court or with authorities.

Insurance Professionals

Everyone and every business has insurance. In addition to knowing the coverage that your policies provide, it is critical that you also know and trust your insurance agent and local broker. These are the people who will fight for you if and when a crisis occurs.

Depending on the company that the policy is purchased from and the kind of policy, there are many details that you will need to know. Having a good relationship with your broker will help. We saw this play out on Long Island after Super Storm Sandy in 2012. Thousands of people and businesses were impacted by flooding and extended power outages. Local insurance professionals played an important part in helping clients submit property claims and get the funds they needed to rebuild and survive. Insurance companies will also assign attorneys to defend clients following incidents. Remember to look at this part of your policy to get an understanding of how it works and get the name of the firm that could potentially be defending you.

Often crisis situations occur without warning. Trying to manage them as they happen is a challenge. Take the time in advance to create a plan, put together a list of the critical actions that need to be taken and be sure that you have all necessary contact information at your fingertips. Keep copies of your plan at the office, at your home and in a place that is accessible online at all times.

Lifeguards are on duty to protect as well as to jump-in to save a swimmer in an emergency. Every business needs to have a team of “lifeguards” watching out for the management and the brand. The swimmer (the business owner or management) must also know what to do in case of a crisis and certainly never take risks when the lifeguards are not on duty.

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

@corbettpr

Marketing Lessons from Beach Wrestling

Beach Wrestling.

Beach Wrestling.

On a hot Saturday afternoon I went for a stroll on the boardwalk in Long Beach, Long Island, New York. Thousands of people were enjoying the beach, walking, biking, playing volleyball and wrestling. Yes, wrestling.

It is commonplace for concerts to be held along this iconic Long Island boardwalk. From a distance I could see a crowd gathered in front of a stage. I approached the stage but did not hear any music. I thought to myself maybe the performers are between songs or sets. As I got closer I could see there was some sort of competition going on. When I arrived, my assumption was correct.

I saw three rings. These “rings” were basically rope circles about 20 feet across. I wondered what was happening. Then a young Asian woman entered one of the rings. She warmed up and stretched. A few moments later a young man entered the ring. Before I knew it they were grappling. The match was quite good; as a high school wrestler, I appreciated the skill and the dedication of athletes like these two young people. A minute later another wrestling match started in the second ring. Two very large young men squared off. It was more akin to sumo wrestling than the match in the first ring with the smaller athletes.

Both matches lasted just a few minutes. I can’t see how they could go very long in the 90-plus degree heat. The young lady, by the way, did not win, but it was close.

You never know where you will be when you see something remarkable. I vaguely recall someone mentioning wrestling at the beach. I thought this was just a bunch of friends getting together and going at it. I learned that it is considered a real sport and that right here on Long Island people of all ages and both sexes are enthusiasts. It’s great to see people compete in sports that they love.

Beach wrestling at the Jersey Shore.

Beach Wrestling

What I watched was remarkable in another way. Although it was not the first time for me to see men and women compete against each other, this was not any ordinary competition. The young lady was obviously there to compete and no doubt she loves this sport. She appeared dedicated, skilled and fearless. She had the crowd on her side and she got the attention of those – like me – walking by. The lesson here is don’t be afraid to pursue your passions and don’t let people tell you that you can’t do something. You may not win the match, but you are in the ring. Simply being in the ring allows you to make an impression on others and gain valuable experience.

Every week I talk with business people who relate their ongoing struggles to achieve the level of success that they want and need. Many fear taking chances with their marketing and marketing dollars. They sit on the sidelines; they don’t jump into the ring so they fail to get the attention they need to grow and succeed.

If you are not ready to wrestle (build your brand and market yourself), then find a coach, get some training and start preparing (read books, blogs and listen to podcasts or attend seminars). Business is a wrestling match; you must get in the ring with your competition to show the audience (your prospects) your skills and abilities. When you make a positive impression in the ring, you will gain respect and this will stimulate business growth.

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

@corbettpr

Is it Time for a Business or Personal Branding Makeover or Update?

Tailoring.

Tailoring.

Technology and social media are rapidly changing. Strategies for networking and personal marketing have also changed. Small business owners, networkers and those in sales roles need to adapt and update their approaches. I continue to urge people to create a personal marketing plan and implement it. Simply doing this creates systems and strategies that will make marketing efforts more efficient and more importantly, more effective.

With the changes taking place in technology, especially in video and mobile, personal marketers need to evaluate their brands regularly. I was recently looking back at some of my Facebook posts from six years ago. It is amazing how much has changed. I also took a few minutes to examine my social media sites. This is a process that you should do yourself periodically.

What should you look at?

Are you leveraging the power of video?

If you are not using video on your social media platforms and your website you are three years behind your competitors. According to YouTube – “Every day people watch hundreds of millions of hours on YouTube and generate billions of views.”

In our mobile society it is clear that people want to watch videos on their devices.

According to this article from eMarketer, “Adults in the US will spend an average of 5 hours, 31 minutes watching video each day this year.” Digital devices are fueling growth.

Here is the full article with other interesting statistics:

http://www.emarketer.com/Article/US-Adults-Spend-55-Hours-with-Video-Content-Each-Day/1012362

People want to watch video and if you don’t have video on your website and don’t use video regularly on your social media channels you are three years behind your savvy competitors. If you have videos that you did three or more years ago, don’t delete them, but look to update them. Spend the time and make the investment today to create quality videos. There are many easy to use tools, apps, devices and cameras that can be used today. You can do it yourself but consider the quality of videos and how they will be used. Create a plan and a strategy for creating new video content at least every quarter.

In terms of a makeover, if you look a lot different in person today than you looked three or four years ago in a video, then it’s time for a makeover.

Is your image up to date?

Similar to video, if your image has changed you need to update your profile photos. I have covered this topic many times in blogs. Your real world image should match your online image. Every two or three years get a new head shot. For some people you may also want to get more “glamor” or stylistic images done. This all depends on your business and your personal brand. If you are a professional speaker, in the entertainment business, marketing, sales or other creative industries, images that reflect your personality, sense of humor or style might be more appropriate for use (not for your LinkedIn profile). Check out this article from The New York Times: “When Selfies Won’t Do – Glamor Photos Replace Selfies for Personal Branding.” When you are looking to present your brand and have social media and websites where you can do this, look to be more creative. For a brand makeover or update, a glamor shot or two could be the right approach. Remember use a professional photographer. Don’t risk taking photos yourself.

Review your profiles

Over the course of time everyone’s approaches, strategies and areas of expertise change and evolve. When was the last time you updated or made changes to your LinkedIn profile, your Twitter profile, your Facebook profile, your YouTube channel description or your bio on your website? Take a look at them and compare them to what you are doing now. Are they accurate? Even if they are, it might be time to re-draft them, keeping in mind how you and social media has changed. Make sure to use important keywords that describe why you do what you do, what value you offer and why you are different and better than your competition.

Review your brand and brand message

Take a look at your personal mission statement and vision. Has it changed or have you gone off-message? Examine your blog and social media posts to see if they are still consistent with your message and your personal marketing plan. It is easy to lose focus when we are bombarded with so many messages every day. Changing and pivoting to adapt and take advantage of opportunities is fine, but review your core mission and values. You may have to get back on course or create a plan to chart a new direction.

Websites

A restaurant website before and after a redesign.

A restaurant website before and after a redesign.

Websites are a central focus for most businesses. Take the time to look at your website and address the content updates, image updates and video updates. Today websites need to convey a quick message and tell a story. Does your site accurately tell your story? Does it look up to date? I am in the process of updating the look and format of my own website and blog. Examine your site but also look at competitors and others you respect. If it is time for a change, start the process. A new website or a website conversion takes time and a budget. An old and out of date website presents the wrong image and this must be addressed.

Marketing and branding takes time and effort. It certainly takes a budget and planning as well. Reviewing your brand regularly is important. You must keep up with technology and leverage what it has to offer to keep your image fresh and on track.

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

@corbettpr

Consistency Matters: Does the Real World Brand Match Your Online Brand?

Target and Single ArrowFor nearly three decades in the public relations business, I have had the pleasure of working with some great entrepreneurs and businesspeople.

The firm’s goals have remained the same: we seek to secure media coverage to build a person’s brand, reputation and attract attention. Building a brand takes time. In the past I have discussed the questions you need to ask to define your brand and I have outlined what is needed in your personal marketing plan.

With so many ways to promote your brand and with so many places online where your brand resides, a challenge surfaces: consistency. Is your brand image and message consistent across all the digital properties that you own? Does this “online brand” match how you present yourself in the real world? I bet some readers have not even thought of this.

It doesn’t matter whether you are a social media marketer using social media for your brand, business or if you are just a casual user of social media. Guess what? You have an online brand and you need to know how you are presenting yourself. For those of you who are not practitioners of social media, you cannot escape either. Even when you don’t have social media accounts of your own, your name is probably online on your company’s website, in directories of the groups that you belong to or perhaps in the media. Have you ever searched for your name? Have you searched for it recently? If not, you should. You need to see how your brand is represented online and what people are saying about you.  Are people making positive comments, negative comments are they not saying anything at all?  Search for your name in Google (and other search engines) to see what comes up. Search down a few pages and make notes of what you find. Search Google Images; does your image come up? Is it an old image? Is the image unflattering? Again, take notes and click on the images, where are they being pulled from? Perhaps images are coming from social media sites such as LinkedIn or Facebook or a newspaper or organizations to which you belong.

Tip: for Gmail/Google Plus users – you can create what is known as Google Alerts. These are Google searches that are done daily or periodically for search terms that you want to monitor. Put your name into the Google Alert system and if your name is mentioned you will get an alert. There is more to this, but begin by creating an alert with your name or, more specifically, your name in quotes such as “Bill Corbett.” This tells Google to search just for your name. If you have a relatively common name like I do, I suggest adding additional words to your search. I use “Bill Corbett” “Public Relations.” This narrows down my search and gets better results – not all the results of all the other Bill Corbett’s in the world. There are quite a few of us by the way.

Businessman Looking in Mirror

Now that you are monitoring your brand, it is time to look at the consistency of your brand. Do you have an elevator speech? Do you have a personal mission statement that you share with people you meet? Do you have an area of expertise that you discuss in the real world? Your answer to all of these questions is likely to be “yes.” How about this question: do you have a certain style of dress or a “look” that you are known for? If you don’t have a specific look, you can be sure the way you present yourself professionally will not go unnoticed. Your message, your mission and the way you look and present yourself needs to be the same (consistent) online as it is in the real world. Your headshots and images need to be professional and consistent. Every written profile also needs to reflect a similar message. Certainly your LinkedIn profile will provide much more information than a Twitter profile, but stay consistent. The graphics and the videos you use must also be consistent. Video is by far the best bridge between the real world and the cyber world. If you can convey on video your brand and message, you are doing it right. Be aware that video is tricky; poor quality videos (poor lighting, poor audio and an awkward presentation) can hurt you and your brand, especially if you are sharp and clear in the real world. Keep an eye on your videos.

Your bios, profiles and content needs to be consistent with your messaging. Think about what you post and the subject matter. If you are a banker or financial services professional, is posting marketing-related content consistent with your brand? If you are a medical professional, are posts about movies and TV appropriate? When using social media for business you must consider these factors. It is not the same if you are using social media to communicate with friends and family. However, in today’s world the lines between what is business and what is personal (for the most part) has faded away. Remember, if you’re online you are representing your brand at all times. You should expect anything and everything you post to be seen by everyone. So if you don’t want friends, employers, prospects, clients or others to see what you are doing, don’t post. In some cases you may not have a choice; friends and others can and will post images of you and mention your name. Again, this is why you need to monitor your brand regularly.

A poor or inconsistent image can result from simply not having your image or content on a LinkedIn, Twitter or other accounts. How does this look to someone you met at a networking event or the person you were introduced to by a friend as a referral? When you don’t bother to project your brand image to prospects, you damage the potential for establishing a business relationship. It’s better not to have an account than to have a blank one. It is shocking to me to see how many networkers and salespeople don’t have completed profiles on LinkedIn. Think of the opportunities you have lost or how this looks when compared to you competition. You’re not looking good online even though you are very impressive in the real world.

Your brand message and image must be consistent in the real world as well as in the cyber world. Take the time to review where your brand resides online and make sure that it is consistent with your real world image. Keep your content consistent and you will be rewarded with a stronger and more effective brand.

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

@corbettpr

What Does “Brand” Mean to You?

Stand OutYour personal brand is your image and how you are perceived (good or bad) in your market. You must always be thinking about your brand and how to grow it.

Look at the letters that spell B-R-A-N-D:

B – Believe in yourself and others will follow.

R – Reputation is your most valuable asset.

A – Authenticity builds trust.

N – Name recognition comes from personal marketing.

D – Determination is required for continued success.

I often write about the need for individuals to have a personal marketing plan. This plan is critically important if individuals wish to be competitive in the business world. How do you start building your brand? Likely, you are doing this without a plan but you will be more effective if you put thought into it and create a foundation for success. You need a strong brand to attract attention, stand out from competitors, beat your competition and develop more business.

Build_Brand[1]

How do you get your brand on track? Here are some questions to ask yourself when you are developing your personal brand and brand message:

  1. Why do you do what you do?
  2. What is your personal mission statement?
  3. What is your personal passion statement and how does this connect with who you are and your career goals?
  4. What makes you different than others in your industry or business sector?
  5. Why do people want to work with you?
  6. What do people like about working with you?

Asking yourself these questions creates the starting point for your personal brand development process. Answering these questions will allow you to gain a better sense how you want to represent yourself. When you define your brand you will then be able to consistently communicate your message.

Using LinkedIn is the perfect place to start. Using the questions provided above and you experience drafting your profile in the first person on LinkedIn. Describe why you do what you do and what sets you apart from others. Your LinkedIn profile is your personal brand page; it reflects who you are and what you offer. People change, so don’t be afraid to modify your profile to reflect what you are doing today, your successes and accomplishments.

By Bill Corbett

Corbett Public Relations Long Island and the World 

@liprguy

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